Food & Early Childhood Development

Curt Ellis of FoodCorps, and Karrie Denniston of Walmart Foundation

E57: How FoodCorps and Walmart are Driving Food Security in the US

November 2019

Imagine you would like to address food, and food insecurity in particular, and could start with a blank slate. What kind of programs and practices would make sense given the incredible array of possibilities? Our guests today, Curt Ellis and Karrie Denniston have addressed this issue in their own work. Welcome to The Leading Voices in Food. Listen to Podcast/Read Transcript about E57: How FoodCorps and Walmart are Driving Food Security in the US »


Maureen Black on Lasting Impact of Food Insecurity on Children

E48: Maureen Black on Lasting Impact of Food Insecurity on Children

September 2019

It is well known, and has been for many years, how prevalent food insecurity is in the US and elsewhere. People are especially moved when they think of children who are malnourished. Our guest Dr Maureen Black is one of the world's leading experts on nutrition and its impact on the health and development of children and on how to reduce health disparities by improving child nutrition. Listen to Podcast/Read Transcript about E48: Maureen Black on Lasting Impact of Food Insecurity on Children »


Carolyn Federman of Charlie Carts

E46: Charlie Cart’s Carolyn Federman on Food, Fun, and Classrooms

September 2019

Americans have become distant from their food. It was once the case that people either grew food themselves or perhaps, just one step away from it, buying food from farmers or from markets served by local farmers, but boy, is it ever different now. Food is processed, it's shipped long distances, and people are less in touch with how food is created, how to cook it, and more. There are some impressive efforts underway to help correct this problem. Some of the more impressive ones that focused on children such as the work of Carolyn Federman, the inspiration behind a highly innovative program known as Charlie Cart. Listen to Podcast/Read Transcript about E46: Charlie Cart’s Carolyn Federman on Food, Fun, and Classrooms »


Al Sommer

E23: Al Sommer on Vitamin A, Blindness and Global Politics

March 2019

We speak today with someone whose work is credited with preventing 400,000 cases of blindness and saving as many as 1 million deaths per year. Dr. Alfred Sommer has earned this place in global history. He discovered that Vitamin A deficiency reduces immune responsiveness and resistance to infectious diseases such as diarrhea and measles. He proved that vaccination for smallpox as late as six days after infection can prevent the disease. He demonstrated the effectiveness of a simple and effective tool for monitoring the nutritional health of children at high risk of dying from malnutrition, and he identified an early accurate predictor of optic nerve damage, signaling when to start Glaucoma therapy. Listen to Podcast/Read Transcript about E23: Al Sommer on Vitamin A, Blindness and Global Politics »


Billy Shore, Executive Chair of No Kid Hungry and Share Our Strength

E4: Billy Shore on Politics, Food and our Children's Future

January 2019

If you had the opportunity to shape the country's agenda for addressing hunger, what solutions would you suggest and how would you drive this needed change? The Leading Voices in Food interviews Billy Shore, executive chairman of No Kid Hungry and its parent organization Share Our Strength. Listen to Podcast/Read Transcript about E4: Billy Shore on Politics, Food and our Children's Future »


Kevin Concannon

E5: Kevin Concannon on the Role of Federal & State Food Assistance Programs

January 2019

Imagine presiding over one of the nation's major food assistance programs. The supplemental nutrition assistance program that helps feed more than $40 million Americans. And that this is just part of your job. Few people have seen the inner workings of federal and state food assistance programs as deeply as today's guest, Kevin Concannon, former Undersecretary of Food, Nutrition and Consumer services in the US Department of Agriculture, under President Obama. Listen to Podcast/Read Transcript about E5: Kevin Concannon on the Role of Federal & State Food Assistance Programs »


Marion Hetherington, biopsychologist

E3: Marion Hetherington on Kids, Vegetables and Appetite

January 2019

Ever wonder why some kids like certain vegetables and some don't? Or why some people are super focused on food and others forget to eat? Explore these ideas with biopsychologist Marion Hetherington on the Leading Voices in Food podcast. Listen to Podcast/Read Transcript about E3: Marion Hetherington on Kids, Vegetables and Appetite »


Andrew Prentice

E2: Andrew Prentice on the Genetic Legacy of our Nutrition

January 2019

You have likely heard the saying “You are what you eat.” But what if I told you that how well your parents were eating in the days and months before you were conceived may actually help to determine how your body works—at the cellular level—for your entire life? As it turns out, you were optimized to survive in your parents’ nutritional environment. The Leading Voices in Food podcast series, produced by the World Food Policy Center at Duke University, interviews Dr Andrew Prentice, professor of international nutrition that the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. Prentice is a distinguished scholar on the effects of diet on human health and disease and as a world leader in global health research, he has made major contributions in many areas, two of which are the regulation of Human Energy Balance and obesity and the effects of malnutrition on maternal and child health and poor populations. Listen to Podcast/Read Transcript about E2: Andrew Prentice on the Genetic Legacy of our Nutrition »


Billy Shore, Executive Chair of No Kid Hungry and Share Our Strength

E1: Billy Shore on Feeding Kids in the US and Abroad

January 2019

Have you ever wondered why people are hungry in a world that produces more than enough food to feed them? The Leading Voices in Food interviews Billy Shore, the executive chair of No Kid Hungry and its parent organization Share our Strength. Listen to Podcast/Read Transcript about E1: Billy Shore on Feeding Kids in the US and Abroad »


First Thousand Days, by Roger Thurow

The First Thousand Days

June 2018

The first 1,000 days of a child’s life are crucial. But around the world, many women face huge obstacles when it comes to helping their children grow and thrive – especially in those first thousand days. Roger Thurow traveled from the highlands of western Guatemala to rural Uganda, over to India, and back home to Chicago to see – in an intimate way -- how those crucial early years play out in four very different locations. Roger Thurow’s book is called The First 1,000 Days: A Crucial Time for Mothers and Children—And the World. Subscribe to the Policy 360 podcast: www.policy360.org Image: Eric Froehling/Unsplash/Creative Commons Music: Blue Dot Sessions/Creative Commons Listen to Podcast/Read Transcript about The First Thousand Days »


Becoming Breastfeeding Friendly

Becoming Breastfeeding Friendly

May 2018

It’s widely known that breastfeeding babies is very important. Breast milk is often called "liquid gold" because it has so many benefits. Most experts recommend mothers breastfeed for six months exclusively after birth – but most women don’t do so. In the U.S.. only 27 percent of mothers reach the 6-month mark. In the U.K., it’s less than one percent. Professor Rafael Pérez-Escamilla of the Yale School of Public Health has been working on a way to boost and sustain breastfeeding rates – and he’s doing it on a country-by-country basis. Find out more about the Becoming Breastfeeding Friendly project: publichealth.yale.edu/bfci/ Subscribe to Policy 360: www.policy360.org Image: Chiến Phạm/Unsplash/Creative Commons Music: Blue Dot Sessions/Creative Commons Listen to Podcast/Read Transcript about Becoming Breastfeeding Friendly »


Grocery shopping couple

What Health Secrets Do Our Grocery Receipts Hold?

September 2017

While Emily Oster was pregnant, she evaluated data behind many of the accepted rules of pregnancy. (Should you drink caffeine? Is sushi OK?) She says most advice given to moms-to-be is wrong. More recently, she's been studying how grocery store purchases change once a person has been diagnosed with a health challenge like diabetes. Household scanner data "helps us look at people outside of a monitored health setting, and really see in the real world what are the changes people make, what changes are impossible to make, and who is able to change a lot," she says. Emily Oster is an Associate Professor of Economics at Brown University. Her book is called Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom Is Wrong--and What You Really Need to Know. Image used under a Creative Commons License. www.flickr.com/photos/photosbystan/ Music: Impromptu in Blue by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license. Artist: www.incompetech.com/ Listen to Podcast/Read Transcript about What Health Secrets Do Our Grocery Receipts Hold? »