Food Policy Podcasts

Jennifer Pomeranz on Food and Industry Tactics Driving Preemption

E35: Jennifer Pomeranz on Food Policy and Industry Tactics Driving Preemption

April 2019

In the past several years, cities in California led the way in passing taxes on sugar-sweetened beverages. Berkeley was first with Oakland, San Francisco and Albany, California following, each with the aim of improving public health by decreasing consumption of beverages known to be associated with obesity, diabetes, and other medical issues, and to raise revenue for needed programs. But then something historic happened: preemption. A leading expert on the application of the law on public health and on the issue of preemption is Jennifer Pomeranz. Listen to Podcast/Read Transcript about E35: Jennifer Pomeranz on Food Policy and Industry Tactics Driving Preemption »


Juan Rivera on Mexico's successful soda tax

E34: Juan Rivera on the Success of Mexico's Soda Tax

April 2019

For people around the world who believe that taxing sugared beverages is a good public health policy, the country of Mexico passing such a tax was a stunning victory. There was a significant need in Mexico to be sure, given high rates of obesity, especially in children, and very high consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages. But there was also a powerful beverage industry fighting the taxes. A fascinating story unfolded as the tax was being considered with a number of courageous and creative individuals at the center. One key figure is today's guest, Dr. Juan Rivera. Listen to Podcast/Read Transcript about E34: Juan Rivera on the Success of Mexico's Soda Tax »


Al Sommer

E23: Al Sommer on Vitamin A, Blindness and Global Politics

March 2019

We speak today with someone whose work is credited with preventing 400,000 cases of blindness and saving as many as 1 million deaths per year. Dr. Alfred Sommer has earned this place in global history. He discovered that Vitamin A deficiency reduces immune responsiveness and resistance to infectious diseases such as diarrhea and measles. He proved that vaccination for smallpox as late as six days after infection can prevent the disease. He demonstrated the effectiveness of a simple and effective tool for monitoring the nutritional health of children at high risk of dying from malnutrition, and he identified an early accurate predictor of optic nerve damage, signaling when to start Glaucoma therapy. Listen to Podcast/Read Transcript about E23: Al Sommer on Vitamin A, Blindness and Global Politics »


Martin Bloem

E19: Martin Bloem - Embrace Complexity to Fix the Food System

March 2019

One of the most important questions facing the world is how it will feed itself both now and in the future. Answering this question will require the brightest minds; people who will understand the complex interactions of trade, poverty, climate change, agriculture technology, and the ever-changing political landscape from country to country. And this is just a name, some of the factors. Few people are as capable of seeing how all these pieces fit together as our guest Dr. Martin Bloem, professor, and director of the Center for a Livable Future at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Listen to Podcast/Read Transcript about E19: Martin Bloem - Embrace Complexity to Fix the Food System »


Ashley Gearhardt on Food Addiction and You..Yes, You

E18: Ashley Gearhardt on Food Addiction and You...Yes, You.

March 2019

Can some foods have addictive properties? We all have cravings for some things--chocolate, let's say? But can food really hijack the brain much as happens with classic substances of abuse? And are foods engineered by the food industry in ways that trigger addictive like reactions in the brain? Such are the questions being asked by Dr. Ashley Gearhardt. She is an associate professor of psychology and the clinical science area at the University of Michigan and a leading researcher in the field of food and the brain, food, and addiction in particular. Listen to Podcast/Read Transcript about E18: Ashley Gearhardt on Food Addiction and You...Yes, You. »


Sara Bleich on Menu Labeling, Marketing and Public Health

E16: Sara Bleich on Menu Labeling, Marketing and Public Health

February 2019

Do you make better food choices when you see calorie counts listed on restaurant menus? Do you think food stamp recipients should be able to buy unhealthy foods, like sugary drinks? And what role should the government play in our food choices? We’ll explore these questions on The Leading Voices in Food with Dr. Sara Bleich. Listen to Podcast/Read Transcript about E16: Sara Bleich on Menu Labeling, Marketing and Public Health »


Mark Bittman on Eating Sustainably and Agroecology

E13: Mark Bittman on Eating Sustainably and Agroecology

February 2019

Many people in the modern world have become distant from their food. They may not know where it's grown, who grows it, who produces it, or who harvests it, what impact its production has on the environment, how it is processed, how to prepare it, and more. A champion of shrinking this distance and of understanding how all these pieces fit together is an activist, and an advocate, and a journalist. A person whose career has been devoted to making it easier for people to eat healthy food, and good food, Mark Bittman. Listen to Podcast/Read Transcript about E13: Mark Bittman on Eating Sustainably and Agroecology »


Thomas Farley

E7: Thomas Farley on the Real Returns of the Philadelphia Soda Tax

January 2019

Today's guest has had a fascinating career and has made significant contributions to public health in Louisiana, New York, and in Pennsylvania. He says he learned the true value of public health investigating syphilis and legionnaire's disease outbreaks while working for the Center for Disease Control's epidemic intelligence service. He's worked on the front lines to prevent and control infectious diseases such as HIV and sexually transmitted diseases, and his research on obesity led him to see the obesity epidemic in our country as an outcome of an unhealthy environment. Dr. Thomas Farley is the Health Commissioner for the City of Philadelphia and he led work to pass a tax on sugar-sweetened beverages, seen widely as a significant success in health policy. Listen to Podcast/Read Transcript about E7: Thomas Farley on the Real Returns of the Philadelphia Soda Tax »


Billy Shore, Executive Chair of No Kid Hungry and Share Our Strength

E4: Billy Shore on Politics, Food and our Children's Future

January 2019

If you had the opportunity to shape the country's agenda for addressing hunger, what solutions would you suggest and how would you drive this needed change? The Leading Voices in Food interviews Billy Shore, executive chairman of No Kid Hungry and its parent organization Share Our Strength. Listen to Podcast/Read Transcript about E4: Billy Shore on Politics, Food and our Children's Future »


Kevin Concannon

E5: Kevin Concannon on the Role of Federal & State Food Assistance Programs

January 2019

Imagine presiding over one of the nation's major food assistance programs. The supplemental nutrition assistance program that helps feed more than $40 million Americans. And that this is just part of your job. Few people have seen the inner workings of federal and state food assistance programs as deeply as today's guest, Kevin Concannon, former Undersecretary of Food, Nutrition and Consumer services in the US Department of Agriculture, under President Obama. Listen to Podcast/Read Transcript about E5: Kevin Concannon on the Role of Federal & State Food Assistance Programs »


Billy Shore, Executive Chair of No Kid Hungry and Share Our Strength

E1: Billy Shore on Feeding Kids in the US and Abroad

January 2019

Have you ever wondered why people are hungry in a world that produces more than enough food to feed them? The Leading Voices in Food interviews Billy Shore, the executive chair of No Kid Hungry and its parent organization Share our Strength. Listen to Podcast/Read Transcript about E1: Billy Shore on Feeding Kids in the US and Abroad »


Souring on Sweet: The Great Soda Wars, Part I

Brownell on Gastropod: Souring on Sweet - The Great Soda Wars, Part I

December 2018

Public health researchers agree: the evidence is clear that Americans consume way too much sugar, that sugar contributes to weight gain, and that rising rates of obesity in the U.S. will lead to significant health problems in the future. What's much less clear is what to do about it. In this special, first-ever two-part episode of Gastropod, we tell the story of how sugary beverages—soda, in particular—became Public Health Enemy #1. Why are politicians and scientists targeting soda? Why have most attempts to pass soda taxes failed? And do these taxes even work to reduce consumption and obesity? Duke's Kelly Brownell featured. Listen to Podcast/Read Transcript about Brownell on Gastropod: Souring on Sweet - The Great Soda Wars, Part I »


Duke 360 Podcast

Rethinking Food Policy

September 2018

Kelly Brownell has stepped away from his role as dean of the Sanford School of Public Policy to launch a new World Food Policy Center at Duke. He talks with Sanford's new dean, Judith Kelley, about key challenges that he hopes the new will begin to address. For example, he hopes to get people in the food and food policy space talking to each other. The academic field is segmented, he says. "There is a lot of depth around particular topics but not much breadth across them and very little communications across them." Subscribe to the Policy 360 podcast: www.policy360.org Image: Melissa Carrico Music: Blue Dot Sessions/Creative Commons Listen to Podcast/Read Transcript about Rethinking Food Policy »


Fisherman

Rethinking How Fisheries Contribute to Global Food Needs

June 2018

It’s often said that one in 10 people on the planet is hungry, and that number is on the rise. Abigail Bennett is the lead author on a new report on the contribution of fisheries to food and nutrition security. Abby has served as a fellow at the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization and is a consultant at the World Bank. She talks with Kelly Brownell of the Sanford School of Public Policy at Duke University. Find out more about the report, The Nutrition and Food Security Contributions of Capture Fisheries: sanford.duke.edu/articles/new-rep…apture-fisheries The report's authors include Abigail Bennett of Duke University’s World Food Policy Center, Pawan Patil of the World Bank, Kristin Kleisner and Doug Rader of the Environmental Defense Fund, John Virdin of the Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions and Xavier Basurto of the Duke University Marine Lab. Subscribe to the Policy 360 podcast: www.policy360.org Image: Andreas Barsch/Unsplash/Creative Commons Music: Blue Dot Sessions/Creative Commons Listen to Podcast/Read Transcript about Rethinking How Fisheries Contribute to Global Food Needs »


Soda Pop Girl

Future of Food Policy: Taxing Soda Works

September 2016

Mexico experimented recently with a 10% tax on sugary beverages. And it worked. A year after the tax was implemented there was a 12% decline in soda purchases. Barry Popkin is the director of the Nutrition Transition Research program at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He says the Mexico experiment is important, and other countries will follow suit. "We expect as the taxes get larger, and the effects are shown to be significant that countries will realize, they both need revenue, they need money for public health ... the benefits are enormous in getting people conscious of the cost of sugary beverages," he says. This conversation is part of a series called The Future of Food Policy. The conversations were conducted at Duke University as a part of the development of a new initiative, the World Food Policy Center. Find out more: sanford.duke.edu/articles/world%E…haul-experts-say [Image: vintage Blue/Pixabay] Listen to Podcast/Read Transcript about Future of Food Policy: Taxing Soda Works »


Child Models Ways to End Obesity

Future of Food Policy: Chile Models Ways to End Obesity

September 2016

Barry Popkin is one of the world's leading thinkers when it comes to human relationship to food. He runs the Nutrition Transition Research program at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. When asked to point to a country that is doing things right when it comes to obesity, he points to Chile. "Chile is unique. First, they cut the cost of all non-caloric beverages," he says. (So buying a water is cheaper than buying a soda.) The country also curbs junk food marketing to children. They are now adding a marketing ban to adults as well where unhealthy food will be banned from 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. There will be a "danger" sticker for unhealthy foods, and a "mega-tax" of 30 to 40 percent on such foods is likely. "So they truly will probably be the first country to turn around obesity," Popkin says. This conversation is part of a series called The Future of Food Policy. The conversations were conducted at Duke University as a part of the development of a new initiative, the World Food Policy Center. Find out more: sanford.duke.edu/articles/world%E…haul-experts-say [Image from Croc_Star via Flickr/CC] Listen to Podcast/Read Transcript about Future of Food Policy: Chile Models Ways to End Obesity »


Human digestive system

Future of Food Policy: Revise Doctor Training

September 2016

The U.S. has a huge problem with obesity, yet only one in eight visits with a doctor involves healthy diet counseling. A new initiative seeks to change that. "We are proposing to do two things at the same time," says Lisel Loy of the Bipartisan Policy Center. "The first thing is to improve the way we train not just doctors but all health professionals to address issues of nutrition and physical activity. And second is to change the way we pay for that kind of care." Such changes are critical, Loy says, and it's important that the changes happen at the same time. "If you have physicians trained to do this, but that kind of care is not covered, it's unlikely doctors and others will have the incentive to provide that kind of care," she notes. This conversation is part of a series called The Future of Food Policy. The conversations were conducted at Duke University as a part of the development of a new initiative, the World Food Policy Center. Find out more: sanford.duke.edu/articles/world%E…haul-experts-say Listen to Podcast/Read Transcript about Future of Food Policy: Revise Doctor Training »


Finland is a leader in food policy

Future of Food Policy: Hello, Finland

August 2016

Are there places in the world where changes in policy have resulted in healthier people? Policymakers should look to Finland. The people used to have a diet with high saturated fat and sodium consumption, and Finns had extremely high rates of heart disease. Now, however, policies encourage food producers to remove saturated fat from milk, and discourage them from marketing products with sodium levels. Now, the rate of heart disease in Finland is close to that of Italy, says Francesco Branca of the World Health Organization. This conversation is part of a series called The Future of Food Policy. The conversations were conducted at Duke University as a part of the development of a new initiative, the World Food Policy Center. Find out more: sanford.duke.edu/articles/world%E…haul-experts-say (Photo by Claudio.Ar, Flickr/CC) Listen to Podcast/Read Transcript about Future of Food Policy: Hello, Finland »


Blurry Sodas

Should there be a "sugar tax" in Britain?

August 2016

The Public Health England report was released yesterday after a long delay. The report takes a close look at what can be done about rising obesity rates in the UK. One recommendation is for a price increase of a minimum of 10% to 20% on high-sugar products. This "sugar tax" is controversial. BBC host James Coomarasamy interviewed Sanford's dean Kelly Brownell about the idea. Brownell is "the American who came up with the idea of taxing fizzy drinks," said Coomarasamy. Brownell noted that in Mexico and other locations, such taxes are working, and people are drinking sugary drinks less. [Image: Mohammad Khedmati via Flickr/Creative Commons] Listen to Podcast/Read Transcript about Should there be a "sugar tax" in Britain? »


Betsy Holden, CEO, Kraft Foods

Future of Food Policy: Businesses Must Adapt

August 2016

The world faces profound problems in supplying nutritious food to its growing population. 900 million people are undernourished. At the same time, 3 billion people will be moving into the middle class by 2030. Access to water is expected to be of concern. And currently a huge percentage of global food is wasted. Savvy business leaders are already trying to adapt to the changes they know are coming. "I think we all are excited by, but also daunted by the resource scarcity challenges coming forward," says Betsy Holden. Betsy is former co-CEO of Kraft Foods and CEO of Kraft Foods North America. Now she's a consultant for McKinsey & Company. She thinks part of the answer is in strategic partnerships. "Too many people are working on pieces of the puzzle, and not enough people are working across and really integrating and convening so that we're getting to more end-to-end solutions." This conversation is part of a series called The Future of Food Policy. The conversations were conducted at Duke University as a part of the development of a new initiative, the World Food Policy Center. Find out more: sanford.duke.edu/articles/world%E…haul-experts-say Listen to Podcast/Read Transcript about Future of Food Policy: Businesses Must Adapt »