All Podcasts

Blueprint for a National US Food Strategy

E100: Blueprint for a National US Food Strategy

November 2020

This podcast focuses on the need for a national food strategy and why now is the right time to fix the US food system. I'm talking today with two food policy experts who have collaborated on an effort with an ambitious title of Blueprint for a National Food Strategy. They argue it's time to coordinate policymaking that identifies national food systems priorities, and develop a process that gives the public an opportunity to weigh in on the trade offs inherent in food policymaking. Emily Broad Lieb is the Faculty Director of the Harvard Law School Food Law and Policy Clinic. And Laurie Beyranevand is the Director of the Center for Agriculture and Food Systems at Vermont Law school. Listen to Podcast/Read Transcript about E100: Blueprint for a National US Food Strategy »


Xavier Morales on Soda Taxes and Equity

E99: How Soda Taxes Can Drive Equity and Community Wellbeing

November 2020

Soda taxes now exist in about 50 countries around the world and in a number of US cities. They raise lots and lots of money. How would you suggest that the revenues be used? This podcast focuses on the connection between sugar-sweetened beverage taxes and racial and social equity. We're speaking today with a champion of community-driven approaches to health equity and environmental justice. My guest is Xavier Morales, the executive director of The Praxis Project, the national organization headquartered in Oakland and dedicated to supporting communities, building power for health. Listen to Podcast/Read Transcript about E99: How Soda Taxes Can Drive Equity and Community Wellbeing »


Rudy Espinoza, Camryn Smith

E93: EFOD Impact: Aligning Financial Support with Community Wellbeing

November 2020

This is the final podcast in a five-part series focused on Equitable Food Oriented Development, a growing movement to promote food projects and enterprises as vehicles for building community wealth, health and self-determination. With us today are two leaders in this movement: urban planner Rudy Espinosa, the executive director of inclusive action for the city in Los Angeles and community activist and organizer, Camryn Smith, the founding member of Communities in Partnership, the Grassroots Organization in the old East Durham, North Carolina. Listen to Podcast/Read Transcript about E93: EFOD Impact: Aligning Financial Support with Community Wellbeing »


Eleni Towns, No Kid Hungry

E98: The COVID-19 Pandemic Response of No Kid Hungry

November 2020

This podcast is part of a series focused on the far-reaching impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the food system. Today we’re looking at how responses to the pandemic have affected food availability and nutrition for one of America’s most vulnerable populations – young children. Joining me is Eleni Towns, the Associate Director of the No Kid Hungry Campaign at Share Our Strength. Listen to Podcast/Read Transcript about E98: The COVID-19 Pandemic Response of No Kid Hungry »


 Can a New Commission Jumpstart Progress Towards Zero Hunger?

E97: Can a New Commission Jumpstart Progress Towards Zero Hunger?

November 2020

Progress towards Sustainable Development Goal 2: Zero Hunger is stalling, and the Covid-19 Pandemic is erasing the progress of the last decade in many parts of the world. Is it possible to re-energize on this issue? Could a new commission make a difference? Today, we’re talking with the authors of a new report entitled "High Level Commissions and Global Policymaking Prospects for Accelerating Progress Toward SDG2." Geoff Gertz is a fellow in the Global Economy and Development Program at the Brookings Institution. And Sarah Zoubek, is the Associate Director of the World Food Policy Center here at Duke University. Listen to Podcast/Read Transcript about E97: Can a New Commission Jumpstart Progress Towards Zero Hunger? »


Developing through Community Identity and Sense of Place

E91: Developing through Community Identity and Sense of Place

October 2020

Equitable Food Oriented Development is a growing movement to promote food projects and enterprises as vehicles for building community wealth, health and self-determination. With us today are two leaders in this movement. It is my pleasure to welcome Rashida Ferdinand, a fifth generation, lower ninth ward homeowner in New Orleans and an organizer of the Sankofa Community Development Corporation and Lorena Andrade, the executive director of La Mujera Obrera in El Paso, Texas. This is the third podcast in a five part series, focused on equitable food oriented development. Listen to Podcast/Read Transcript about E91: Developing through Community Identity and Sense of Place »


The Role & Promise of Rural Faith Communities in Solving Hunger

E96: The Role & Promise of Rural Faith Communities in Solving Hunger

October 2020

Food insecurity in children is a tragic issue around the world and in the US. In America, the issue is especially challenging in rural areas. Rural faith communities often play a central role in addressing rural child hunger, and the support needs and desires of these organizations are nuanced by their faith tradition. This is the subject of a report done jointly by the Duke World Food Policy Center and the No Kid Hungry program of Share Our Strength. It is entitled, Rural Child Hunger and Faith Community Engagement. Joining us today are three experts on this issue. Emma Lietz Bilecky, the chief author of this report, received her graduate training at Duke University and is now Research Fellow with Princeton Theological Seminary’s Farminary project. Norman Wirzba and Robb Webb are some of the nation’s leading thinkers on issues of food and faith. Norman Wirzba a faculty member of the Duke Divinity School and has written some of the most influential texts on food and faith, and Robb Webb is Director of the Rural Church Division of The Duke Endowment and Chair of the Rural Life Committee of the North Carolina Council of Churches. Listen to Podcast/Read Transcript about E96: The Role & Promise of Rural Faith Communities in Solving Hunger »


Neelam Sharma, Trisha Chakrabarti

E90: Digging In To Equitable Food Oriented Development

October 2020

This is the second podcast in a five-part series, focused on Equitable Food Oriented Development. EFOD as it's called, is a growing movement to promote food projects and enterprises as vehicles for building community wealth, health, and self-determination. With us today, are two leaders in this movement, and it is my pleasure to welcome, Neelam Sharma the Executive Director of Community Services Unlimited a nonprofit based in South Central, Los Angeles and Trisha Chakrabarti who manages EFOD work at the DAISA Enterprises. We will discuss a field scan of 80 organizations dedicated that EFOD principals and sample EFOD projects, to explore the lasting impact. Listen to Podcast/Read Transcript about E90: Digging In To Equitable Food Oriented Development »


Saskia Osendarp

E95: COVID-19 Disruptions to Nutrition for Mothers and Children Could Cost the World a Generation

October 2020

This podcast is part of a series focused on the far-reaching impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the food system. Today, we're looking at how the pandemic is driving up numbers, children experiencing or at risk for malnutrition, for wasting, and for possible death. Our guest expert is Dr. Saskia Osendarp, Executive Director of The Micronutrient Forum in Washington, DC. Listen to Podcast/Read Transcript about E95: COVID-19 Disruptions to Nutrition for Mothers and Children Could Cost the World a Generation »


Neelam Sharma, Trisha Chakrabarti

E89: Defining Equitable Food Oriented Development - EFOD 101

October 2020

This is the first podcast in a five part series focused on equitable food-oriented development. EFOD, as it is called, is a growing movement to promote food projects and enterprises as vehicles for building community wealth, health, and self-determination. We will be delving into the origins and the unique outcomes of equitable food-oriented development projects, the role of the community identity in this work, and the potential for re-imagining capital access and wealth-building immunity food projects. With us today are two leaders in this movement, and it is my pleasure to welcome Neelam Sharma, the executive director of Community Services Unlimited, a nonprofit based in South Central Los Angeles, and Trisha Chakrabarti, who manages EFOD work at DAISA enterprises Listen to Podcast/Read Transcript about E89: Defining Equitable Food Oriented Development - EFOD 101 »


Alison Conrad on White Narratives in the Food System

E94: 8 Ways White Bias Can Misdirect Food System Work

October 2020

This podcast is part of our series on racial equity in the food system. Today, we're talking with Alison Conrad, a research associate here at the World Food Policy Center. She has just published a research brief on Identifying and Countering White supremacy Culture in the Food System. Listen to Podcast/Read Transcript about E94: 8 Ways White Bias Can Misdirect Food System Work »


Rudy Espinoza, Camryn Smith

E92: Los Angeles and Durham Reimagined Through EFOD

October 2020

This is a fourth podcast in a five-part series focused on equitable food-oriented development. This is a growing movement to promote food projects and enterprises as vehicles for building community wealth, health, and self-determination. With us today are two leaders in this movement, and it is my pleasure to welcome urban planner Rudy Espinoza, the executive director of Inclusive Action for the City in Los Angeles, and community activist and organizer Camryn Smith, the founding member of Communities in Partnership, a grassroots organization in Old East Durham, North Carolina. Listen to Podcast/Read Transcript about E92: Los Angeles and Durham Reimagined Through EFOD »


Michael Goran and Emily Ventura

E87: The Hidden Dangers of Sugar for your Kids

September 2020

This is the first of two podcasts with the authors of a new book entitled, Sugarproof: The Hidden Dangers of Sugar that are Putting Your Child's Health at Risk and What You Can Do. This podcast will cover the wide-ranging effects of sugar on children, and the second podcast will address what can be done in the home and with policy. University of Southern California, Michael Goran, leads the program in diabetes and obesity at Children's Hospital in Los Angeles. His co-author, Dr. Emily Ventura, is a nutrition educator, public health advocate, writer and cook. Listen to Podcast/Read Transcript about E87: The Hidden Dangers of Sugar for your Kids »


Michael Goran and Emily Ventura

E88: How to Sugarproof Your Kids

September 2020

This is the second of two podcasts with the authors of the new book Sugarproof, The Hidden Dangers of Sugar that are Putting Your Child at Risk and What You Can Do. Our first podcast offered a fascinating view of the effects of sugar on children and this podcast will discuss what might be done. University of Southern California's Michael Goran leads the program in Diabetes and Obesity at Children's Hospital of Los Angeles, his co-author Emily Ventura is a nutrition educator, public health advocate, writer and cook. Listen to Podcast/Read Transcript about E88: How to Sugarproof Your Kids »


How One NC Farming Business is Weathering the COVID-19 Pandemic

E86: How One NC Farming Business is Weathering the COVID-19 Pandemic

September 2020

This podcast is part of a series on the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on our food system. And in this interview, we'll be exploring how one North Carolina farming business has coped with the unique challenges of the pandemic and particularly disruptions to longstanding markets and supply chains for farm products. Our guest is Jim Warenda from Wilson, North Carolina. Jim runs a diverse organization that includes Fresh-Pik Produce, the Southeastern Growers Association and Dean’s Farm Market. He's also the President of North Carolina's Strawberry Association. Listen to Podcast/Read Transcript about E86: How One NC Farming Business is Weathering the COVID-19 Pandemic »


Carolyn Barnes on SNAP and WIC

E85: Changes to SNAP and WIC in Response to the Pandemic are Innovations

August 2020

This podcast is part of a series focused on the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on our food system. Today, we are talking about the changes policymakers have made to SNAP and WIC, the country's largest federal nutrition assistance programs. Our guest is Public Policy Professor Carolyn Barnes from the Sanford School of Public Policy at Duke University. Listen to Podcast/Read Transcript about E85: Changes to SNAP and WIC in Response to the Pandemic are Innovations »


Caitlin Welsh

E84: COVID Highlights Need to Change Food Security Strategy

August 2020

This podcast is part of a series focused on the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on our food system. We’re interviewing Caitlin Welsh, director of the Global Food Security Program at the Center for Strategic and International Studies based in Washington DC. Caitlin is a leading expert on global and US food security and particularly on the relationship between food security, urbanization, climate change, and conflict. Listen to Podcast/Read Transcript about E84: COVID Highlights Need to Change Food Security Strategy »


Janet Poppendieck - COVID Highlights the Trouble with Charity Food

E80: Janet Poppendieck - COVID Highlights the Problems with Charity Food

July 2020

This podcast is part of a series focused on the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic. We're exploring today, the role of charitable efforts to address food access. Places such as food banks, soup kitchens and food pantries. Janet Poppendieck has studied the emergency food system in the U.S. for decades. She is professor emerita of sociology at Hunter College, City University of New York and the author of the book, "Sweet Charity, Emergency Food and the End of Entitlement." Listen to Podcast/Read Transcript about E80: Janet Poppendieck - COVID Highlights the Problems with Charity Food »


Janet Poppendieck - Time for Universal Free School Meals

E81: Time for Universal Free School Meals

July 2020

This podcast is part of series focused on the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on our food system. When the pandemic forced schools to close, school districts and states scrambled to keep a nutritional safety net working for vulnerable students. Millions of US students rely on school meals and summer feeding programs to get food each day. I am delighted to welcome Janet Poppendieck from the City University of New York Urban Food Policy Institute to this podcast. She is the author of "Free for All: Fixing School Lunch in America." Listen to Podcast/Read Transcript about E81: Time for Universal Free School Meals »


James Skeet

E82: Rediscovering Navajo Indigenous Agricultural Wisdom

July 2020

There's a great deal to learn from the deep connections between regenerative agriculture and the farming traditions of First Nations people. My guest today is James Skeet, a member of the Navajo Nation and the founder of Spirit Farm in New Mexico, a demonstration farm that draws both Native Americans and others to learn more about issues like composting and regenerative farming techniques. Listen to Podcast/Read Transcript about E82: Rediscovering Navajo Indigenous Agricultural Wisdom »


Michael Kotutwa Johnson

E83: Hopi Farming - Agriculture, Culture, and Environment in Balance

July 2020

Today, we're digging in to the little known origins of regenerative agriculture, a conservation approach to farming and raising animals that focuses on soil health, biodiversity, improving the water cycle, and resilience to climate change. My guest today is Dr. Michael Kotutwa Johnson, a 450th generation Hopi farmer in the dry lands of Arizona and a research associate with the Native American Agriculture Fund. Listen to Podcast/Read Transcript about E83: Hopi Farming - Agriculture, Culture, and Environment in Balance »


Andy Fisher

E79: Andy Fisher on Exploring the Connection Between Industry and Food Banks

July 2020

This podcast is part of a series focused on the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic. The pandemic is exposing a deep flaw in the country's food system, namely stunning levels of food insecurity, but also the transformation of emergency food assistance into what some have characterized as an industry as food charity become big business. Andy Fisher, our guest today is a leader in the Food Security and Food Justice Movement. He founded and led The National Community Food Security Coalition and led Federal Legislation campaigns to gain more than $200 million for community-based food security and farm to school projects. Listen to Podcast/Read Transcript about E79: Andy Fisher on Exploring the Connection Between Industry and Food Banks »


Elle Evans Peterson, Morgan Wittman Gramann

E78: How NC School Nutrition Programs are Grappling with Covid

June 2020

On March 14th of this year when Governor Cooper issued his Executive Order and closed North Carolina public schools statewide, the first challenge was how do we continue to offer this essential service and feed our students? This podcast is part of a series focused on the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on our food system. Today we're looking at how North Carolina's School Meal Programs have adapted during the pandemic and how some school children are continuing to get the nutrition that they need. Listen to Podcast/Read Transcript about E78: How NC School Nutrition Programs are Grappling with Covid »


Katie Wilson, Urban School Food Alliance

E77: School Meals During a Pandemic – What Works with Katie Wilson

June 2020

About 33 million children access school meals every day across the country. Today, we're exploring the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on young students: children who receive much needed nutrition through their school. We interviewed Dr. Katie Wilson, executive director of the Urban School Food Alliance. The Urban School Food Alliance is a nonprofit coalition of the largest school districts in the U.S, including New York, LA, Chicago, Dallas, Philadelphia, Baltimore and Boston. Listen to Podcast/Read Transcript about E77: School Meals During a Pandemic – What Works with Katie Wilson »


Food Fights - A Civil Conversation About Contemporary Food Debates

E76: Food Fights - A Civil Conversation About Contemporary Food Debates

February 2020

Understanding our current food system, where it came from and especially where it might go is much easier if one understands history. Our field needs historians, thoughtful scholars who can do deep exploration of what has preceded the snapshot in time that represents what we're experiencing today. This is why an exciting development was the recent publication of a book entitled Food Fights edited by two historians at North Carolina State University, Charles Ludington and Matthew Booker. We're joined today by both of the editors. Listen to Podcast/Read Transcript about E76: Food Fights - A Civil Conversation About Contemporary Food Debates »


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